среда, 18 мая 2016 г.

Make PVC Look Like Wood

Make PVC Look Like Wood


Make PVC Look Like Wood


Pls help !!!! Which other kind of paint can be used? The water mixable oil colour is very expensive in my country. Many thanks !!!!!!!!


From Chile


I will try wood stain. Many thanks !!!


Let me know if it works!! Try a few layers of it. Let it soak and dry.


No problem. Some comments here have suggested wood stain, normal acrylic or even shoe polish. I must admit, I have not tried these. It's worth an experiment, though. FYI... if you use acrylic, please cover it with a spray-on protector clear coat. Otherwise it will chip off very easily.


PS, what country are you from, may I ask?


So I tried to read this article on my iPad with Safari. After loading at least a dozen ads, I finally see the first step, that after scrolling down gets overlaid with a page covering popover with a tiny X in the top right, that doesn't respond to my tapping.


So I start up my laptop, and open this page in Safari with Ad Block and Ghostery extensions on, and finally the page loads and works, I see all the steps in one page, and no ads.


So I've made an account just to leave you this positive and constructive feedback: please bring ads and popovers back to a level where the site is functional and attractive, or see people like me use more ad blockers to get to the content. You lose ad money in the process and reach the opposite of what you wanted by filling the page with ads.


use Chrome. I use Chrome on my iPad and never see ads. Just the ones on the far right where they belong. Also we don't have control, the instuctible web master is who you should contact.


Tinkerer, I'm certainly sorry you trouble viewing this and other 'ibbles on your iPad. There is however nothing I can do personally. These Instructables are written by fellow users like yourself. We are not web masters for instructables.com, just writers. Make sure you are using the official app when viewing on a tablet or contact the instructables team here and maybe they will help you far more than I can.


I am however pleased you like my 'ibble and that you signed up for an account just to view it. I hope you continue exploring this awesome site and find fun things to do and learn! Have fun! Welcome abord!


Very nice, thanks for sharing


Really creative


thanx!


\u200bAs a woodworker (& general crafts-man) I must say.. this is rather fantastic. It caught my eye due to my love of woodworking, because sometimes that \"worn\" look just isn't in the wood pile, & you don't necessarily want to age some of the other great wood pieces, to make it happen. Couple this with the comment about the heatgun, & Im thinking: potential for textured veneer strips, or heat shaped & filled with spray foam then......... well I'll stop giving away ideas & just make my first instructable, referencing yours for the \"wood\" process. Thank you for this, it's truly amazing.


Thank you very much! This means allot coming from a true craftsman. I love how tangent ideas get from different people! Send me a post when you publish. I hope it does well!


I made a beautiful rain stick with these easy to understand instructions. THanks for sharing


That looks awesome!!! How's it sound? Could you post a vid with audio maybe?? Pleeeeease???


Thanks, It sounds Great!!! I will try to make a short video. How do I post it ?


Hmm... yeah, I didnt think that through. I dont think you can, just photos. Well, if you ever throw it to youtube or facebook, send me a link. Otherwise, Thanks for reading! I'm glad it worked for you!! Great job again.


Everyone that sees this rain stick can't believe it was made from a PVC pipe. It looks just like wood. It was so much fun to make and thanks again for the wonderful instructions. If I make a video, I'll make sure you see it somehow :)


You're welcome! Hey, how about a mini-ible!? What did you use as the inside spokes, loose material and caps of the rain stick? Just curious.


A Mini-ible .... I love it !!!


I drilled completely through a 3-foot long PVC pipe (more than a hundred times) and pushed bamboo kabob skewers through the holes. Most were a bit loose so I glued them with wood glue. A bit messy but it worked. Clipped the excess length and re-glued if necessary. Then I lightly sanded the entire pipe with an electric sander until smooth. As you instructed, marred the surface with a wood file then sanded lightly and painted it with Burnt Umber oil paint. After it dried 24 hours later, I filled the pipe with 1 1/2 cups of rice, peas and beans until I liked the sound. I also added about 50 2-inch long bamboo kabob skewers to the mix to help slow down the progression of the rice, peas and beans. Capped both ends with corks that I found at the local craft store.


I hope this helps. It was a very easy project and I might even make a few more :)


That's Fantastic! You really should write this up and post it! You got all the pics done and everything. (I like your drill press btw, I'm eyeing up a few I want for my maker-space.) Thank you so much for letting me know about this!!


Your welcome. I've been wanting a drill press and found this one for fairly cheep $70


thank you, :)


Sure! : )


this is a great hack... I will be using this to make curtain rods....


This is a set of instructions. What makes it a \"hack\"? I wish people would stop using \"hack\" already


Cyber vernacular aside, I have always thought of \"hack\" as a way of using materials and methods that go against a predetermined or obvious path for those particular ingredients. It's a fairly broad term, or at least has been in my interactions with it and those who use it. I'm currious to know how you feel about it.


You're the 3rd curtain rods I've gotten messages from! I'd love to see them when you're done.


daughter is on limited funds, I'm going there to help her dress her Windows... We'll post a pic here in the comments when I get them done.... I used metal conduit before, they turned out very well, but they are a bit heavy... I think the pvc will be lighter weight... We'll see how it goes.... Won't be for a few weeks, she's in NY and I'm in NC....


Pretty cool. Thanks for sharing.


Wow! These are beautiful, great job!


For the most realistic look only go end to end with the rasp unless you want the effect of distressed wood, wood damaged after construction. Wood is only milled linearly so the grain goes along the piece. Haven't a clue as to how to do knots. Also when texturing try to avoid straight lines.


Query: By oils you mean artist oils not the paint for houses?


All good points! And yes, I used artist oils for this example. I have never tried it with oil based house paint. I have no idea how that might turn out. It's worth an expariment though...


How well/fast does the oil paint dry?


It depends on how thick you lay it. When I shot the pics for this 'ibble, the oil paint took a few days to totally dry. If you're patient, oil paint gives really good looking results and it's highly durable, it's just expensive and takes long. Others have tried wood stain, acrylic and PVC dye. All good, just different results.


Primo - thanks for clear easy instructions! Why oil paint instead to acrylic?


You can use either! Some commenters here suggest PVC dye, wood stain or even shoe polish. All great ideas and probably much more affordable than oil paint. I used oil paint because it spreads easily on PVC and allows for more \"depth of color\" control. (meaning, you can control how much paint there is by wiping softer or harder - not an official term, just one I made up.) Also, as I discovered this technique for art that will be banged, moved and handled, I found acrylic to chip off and leave white spots. Oil doesn't do that, at least not easily.


Please use what ever suits your needs and feel free to share what you find.


Thanks for reading. I hope this works out for you.


Thanks for the info. Nice job.


this is stupendously awesome!!!!!


Thank you! My first \"stupendous\". : )


Quick question: how did you make the black lines I see in the photo in Step Four? Is that just the original stain color collected in the grooves, or did you apply a darker color in the grooves??


That's just the paint collecting in the groves! You were absolutely right! In fact, the more you try to wipe the surface paint/stain off, (leaving the groove paint behind)... the more contrast you'll get between those highs and lows. Pretty groovy, huh?


(sorry, couldn't resist.)


Hahahaha nice punny comment there, buddy. Thanks again for the great info & the quick reponse!


Hahaha nice punny comment there. Thanks for the quick reply & the solid info. Much appreesh!


totes.


Awesome idea & great explanation--thanks so much for sharing, friend!


Really great idea! I have a bunch of PVC stuff at home and making it look like wood will \"hide\" them,


thank you!


I used your Instructable to make perch branches for my arboreal snake. I used a heat tool to shape the PVC. Very helpful and great outcome. Thanks!


They look Great!!! Well done! I love seeing pics of what others did! Your python looks to enjoy it. Good job bending the PVC as well, it looks convincingly organic.


Thanks for posting!!!


Excelente idea¡¡me encanta ya lo estoy planeando para mi jardín¡ Graciassss


I came up with this simple trick to give PVC pipe a realistic wood texture when I built a few plastic didgeridoos a couple of years ago. It would also work for theater, home decor or backyard tiki-bars! Send an invite if you build that last one.


Step 1: What You'll Need.


- PVC, Any size you want.


- Heavy Metal File. Mine has Rasp and Double Cut sides. An 8-inch file like this costs $9 at any hardware store.


- 100 Grit Sandpaper


- Artist Oil Paint. You can use acrylic, but it may chip off unless you seal it.


Other Materials:


- Wire Brush, for clearing the file's teeth of PVC.


- Dust Mask, to prevent PVC dust from getting in your lungs.


A Mini-ible .... I love it !!!


I drilled completely through a 3-foot long PVC pipe (more than a hundred times) and pushed bamboo kabob skewers through the holes. Most were a bit loose so I glued them with wood glue. A bit messy but it worked. Clipped the excess length and re-glued if necessary. Then I lightly sanded the entire pipe with an electric sander until smooth. As you instructed, marred the surface with a wood file then sanded lightly and painted it with Burnt Umber oil paint. After it dried 24 hours later, I filled the pipe with 1 1/2 cups of rice, peas and beans until I liked the sound. I also added about 50 2-inch long bamboo kabob skewers to the mix to help slow down the progression of the rice, peas and beans. Capped both ends with corks that I found at the local craft store.


I hope this helps. It was a very easy project and I might even make a few more :)


Use the rasp side of the file to shred the PVC surface. Pull the file in many directions to give it an organic look. If the file's teeth get clogged, use a wire brush to quickly clear them.


CAUTION: This step will make sharp ridges on the surface of the PVC. Try not to slide your knuckles along the pipe until you have smoothed it out.


Once you're happy with the texture, use the double cut (smoother side) of the file to remove the shavings and sharp ridges on the PVC. Give the plastic a few extra rubs with the sandpaper.


You can use either! Some commenters here suggest PVC dye, wood stain or even shoe polish. All great ideas and probably much more affordable than oil paint. I used oil paint because it spreads easily on PVC and allows for more \"depth of color\" control. (meaning, you can control how much paint there is by wiping softer or harder - not an official term, just one I made up.) Also, as I discovered this technique for art that will be banged, moved and handled, I found acrylic to chip off and leave white spots. Oil doesn't do that, at least not easily.


Please use what ever suits your needs and feel free to share what you find.


Thanks for reading. I hope this works out for you.


A Mini-ible .... I love it !!!


I drilled completely through a 3-foot long PVC pipe (more than a hundred times) and pushed bamboo kabob skewers through the holes. Most were a bit loose so I glued them with wood glue. A bit messy but it worked. Clipped the excess length and re-glued if necessary. Then I lightly sanded the entire pipe with an electric sander until smooth. As you instructed, marred the surface with a wood file then sanded lightly and painted it with Burnt Umber oil paint. After it dried 24 hours later, I filled the pipe with 1 1/2 cups of rice, peas and beans until I liked the sound. I also added about 50 2-inch long bamboo kabob skewers to the mix to help slow down the progression of the rice, peas and beans. Capped both ends with corks that I found at the local craft store.


I hope this helps. It was a very easy project and I might even make a few more :)


Original article and pictures take http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-PVC-Look-Like-Wood/ site

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